Home News Solange Talks Producing, Family, Inspiration, and More In Interview With Beyoncé

Solange Talks Producing, Family, Inspiration, and More In Interview With Beyoncé

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Between the two of them, they had the biggest albums of 2016. For Interview Magazine, Beyoncé interviews Solange for a candid discussion in which they talk about the creative process of Solo’s new album A Seat At The Table. They also discuss womanhood, growing up in Houston, their parents’ impact on how they handle their business, and much more. Read excerpts below.

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A photo posted by Solange (@saintrecords) on

BEYONCÉ: You write your own lyrics, you co-produce your own tracks, you write your own treatments for your videos, you stage all of your performances, all of the choreography … Where does the inspiration come from?

SOLANGE: It varies. For one, I got to have a lot of practice. Growing up in a household with a master class such as yourself definitely didn’t hurt. And, as far back as I can remember, our mother always taught us to be in control of our voice and our bodies and our work, and she showed us that through her example. If she conjured up an idea, there was not one element of that idea that she was not going to have her hand in. She was not going to hand that over to someone. And I think it’s been an interesting thing to navigate, especially watching you do the same in all aspects of your work: Society labels that a control freak, an obsessive woman, or someone who has an inability to trust her team or to empower other people to do the work, which is completely untrue. There’s no way to succeed without having a team and all of the moving parts that help bring it into life. But I do have—and I’m unafraid to say it—a very distinctive, clear vision of how I want to present myself and my body and my voice and my perspective. And who better to really tell that story than yourself? For this record specifically, it really started with wanting to unravel some truths and some untruths. There were things that had been weighing heavy on me for quite some time. And I went into this hole, trying to work through some of these things so that I could be a better me and be a better mom to Julez and be a better wife and a better friend and a better sister. Which is a huge part of why I wanted you to interview me for this piece. Because the album really feels like storytelling for us all and our family and our lineage. And having mom and dad speak on the album, it felt right that, as a family, this closed the chapter of our stories. And my friends’ stories—every day, we’re texting about some of the micro-aggressions we experience, and that voice can be heard on the record, too. The inspiration for this record came from all of our voices as a collective, and wanting to look at it and explore it. I’m so happy I got to take my time in that process. And the end result feels really rewarding.

BEYONCÉ: Well, it brought tears to my eyes to hear both of our parents speak openly about some of their experiences. And what made you choose Master P to speak on the album?

SOLANGE: Well, I find a lot of similarities in Master P and our dad.

BEYONCÉ: Me, too. [laughs]

BEYONCÉ: Okay, now I’m going to go to the speed round … Lady Sings the Blues[1972] or Mahogany [1975]?

SOLANGE: Mahogany! Without a doubt. You know, that’s the first movie that Alan and I watched together. That was our first official date.

BEYONCÉ: That I know. When do you feel most free?

SOLANGE: When I’m in a musical meditation.

Read the full Interview magazine interview here.